December 10, 2003 by

Robert L. Bartley

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Categories: Media, Writers/Editors

rbartley.jpgRobert Leroy Bartley, the Pulitzer Prize-winning editor emeritus of The Wall Street Journal, died on Dec. 10 from cancer. He was 66.
Bartley earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Iowa State University, and a master’s degree in political science from the University of Wisconsin. In 1962, he became a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, working in the newspaper’s Chicago and Philadelphia bureaus before moving to its headquarters in New York.
Bartley joined the editorial section in 1964 and within eight years, became the editorial page editor. He was named editor of the Journal in 1979, won the Pulitzer for editorial writing in 1980 and became a vice president of Dow Jones & Co. in 1983. As one of the most powerful conservative voices in America, Bartley weighed in on economic and political policy, Watergate and the Clinton presidency. Although he retired in 2001, Bartley continued to write the weekly column, “Thinking Things Over,” and penned “The Seven Fat Years: And How to Do It Again,” a book on the economic policy of the Reagan administration.
He won numerous awards, including a citation for excellence from the Overseas Press Club, and an award for distinguished journalism from the American Council on Science and Health. Last week, the White House chose Bartley as a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor.
“Robert L. Bartley is one of the most influential journalists in American history. He helped shape the times in which we live,” President George W. Bush said.

One Response to Robert L. Bartley

  1. James F. Casey

    Robert L. Bartley’s marvelous work managing the Wall Street Journal Editorial page has given us much pleasure because of the salient and rare sanity not generally found in other newspapers such as the New York Times. We mourn his passing and will miss his keen insights expressed in “Thinking Things Over”.

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