April 29, 2004 by

Winson Hudson

4 comments

Categories: Education, Extraordinary People, Writers/Editors

Winson Hudson, a civil rights pioneer and author, died on April 24. Cause of death was not released. She was 87.
The Mississippi native spent her whole life working to correct injustices. She and her sister, Dovie Hudson, joined forces with Medgar Evers in 1963 to establish the Leake County, Miss., chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. After more than 25 years of rejection and enforced literacy tests, Winson became one of the first blacks to be allowed to vote.
In 1964, Dovie filed a lawsuit that helped desegregate Leake County schools. When area banks retaliated against civil rights activists by foreclosing on their homes and farms, Winson invited the Farmers Housing Administration to survey the situation and testified before the U.S. Civil Rights Commission.
For these efforts, their homes were fire bombed by the Ku Klux Klan.
Winson Hudson co-wrote the 2002 book, “Mississippi Harmony: Memoirs of a Freedom Fighter,” with Constance Curry, and spent many years working to improve local health care and early childhood education services. She received the NAACP’s Freedom Award for Outstanding Community Service and the 2003 Second Congressional District Unsung Hero Award. A Head Start center in Leake County is also named in her honor.

4 Responses to Winson Hudson

  1. ashlee hudson

    HI MY NAME IS ASHLEE HUDSON AND I’M HERE TO POST BECAUSE I WANT TO GIVE THANKS TO MY GREAT ANTE’S DOVIE HUDSON(BIG MAMA)AND AUNT WINSON. THEY DID A LOT FOR BLACKS AND I JUST WANT TO SHOW THEM MY APRECCIATION AS APART OF THE FAMILY AND AS APART OF EVERYONE AFFECTED BY IT.

  2. Bridgette Hudson

    My name is Bridgette Michele Hudson and I am 17 going on 18 in May and I just want to say that I am glad my I think great-great-great grandmother Winson Gates Hudson and I just found out that I am related to her and I feel honored and I would like to trace some of my relatives in Mississippi and Louisiana because I would really be honored to meet some of my roots. my sister’s name is Brittini Cleo Hudson.

  3. Shayla Thomas-Patton

    I am so proud to be a member of this family tree. I remember hearing cousin Winson talk about the struggle when I was a little girl visiting Mississippi from Michigan. My great-great grandfather, Whitfield, was Winson’s father John Wesley’s brother. Our lives have bene much improvied by the struggle that they all endured. Thank you cousins Winson and Dovie! We’ll love you always!

  4. Colita Hudson

    I am the great niece of Winson Hudson and the granddaughther of Dovie Hudson and daughter of the late Whitfield Hudson, Sr. I’m extremely proud of my great aunt and my grandmother because if they didn’t have the courage the fight for equality for black people in Mississippi then there wouldn’t have been change. I remember one painful story in particular that my father told us about coming home from a talent show to fine that there home had be bombed by the Ku Klux Klans. He would tell us how they would hide Medgar Evers in there home to keep in safe while he was there on civil rights business. My late aunt Diane Hudson was the first black girl to attend an all white school. The Hudson family is so rich in heritage. There is center dedicated to my great aunt. There is street named after the Hudson family. There is also a book “I Dream A World, Protraits of Black Women Who Changed America” which pay tribute to my great aunt and grandmother. Our generation should continue the legacy that my grandmother and great aunt set for us.

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