April 13, 2005 by

Istvan Danosi

2 comments

Categories: Sports

idanosi.jpgIstvan Danosi, the former fencing coach at Wayne State University in Michigan, died on April 8. Cause of death was not released. He was 93.
A native of Hungary, Danosi fled his country in 1956 when Soviet troops invaded in order to quell a national uprising of anti-communist supporters. He and his wife Margrit and their two children first escaped to Austria, and then immigrated to America. In 1957, Bela de Tuscan, Wayne State’s first fencing coach, invited Danosi to move to Detroit and take over the job upon his retirement.
Known as “The Maestro,” Danosi quickly developed a reputation for creating champions. He became a father figure to his athletes and guided their skills to a new level of excellence. His kind-hearted approach helped turn Wayne State into a collegiate powerhouse in the sport of fencing.
During his 25 years at the school, the fencing master’s teams compiled a 283-59 record and won five National Collegiate Athletic Association Fencing championships. He coached 40 All-Americans and 15 national champions, including his son, Steve F. Danosi.
Danosi was inducted into Wayne State’s Athletic Hall of Fame in 1983 and the Michigan Sports Hall of Fame two years later. A former chairman of the U.S. Academy of Arms (National Fencing Coaches Association) and a member of its accreditation committee, Danosi accredited Muriel Bower from San Fernando State College as the first woman fencing master in the United States. Next season, Wayne State plans to hold a tournament in his honor.

2 Responses to Istvan Danosi

  1. L. W. Fox

    Coach Danosi was a friend, a coach (64-68), and like a father to all of his teams. He will be missed by all of us. I can remember some of the trips we took to the Ann Arbor Fencing Club. He would pick me up at my parents home in N.W. Detroit. After practice, he would ask me if I was hungry for a bowl of ice cream. He had a sweet tooth. We would stop at Big Boy’s for a bowl of ice cream with some chocolate syrup on top.
    I met my wife through fencing. She wasn” a fencer, but she was the sister of one of my best friends on the team.
    The coach always stressed friendship with the members of our team. His eyes would gleam with pride when we told him how we would get together and socialize, even after we had graduated. He used to say that you are a fencer for life.
    May God bless you Coach Danosi. I was honored to be a pall bearer at you funeral.
    Sincerely,
    Louis W. Fox

  2. warsaw hotels

    Coach Danosi was a friend, a coach (64-68), and like a father to all of his teams. He will be missed by all of us. I can remember some of the trips we took to the Ann Arbor Fencing Club. He would pick me up at my parents home in N.W. Detroit. After practice, he would ask me if I was hungry for a bowl of ice cream. He had a sweet tooth. We would stop at Big Boy’s for a bowl of ice cream with some chocolate syrup on top.
    >
    >I met my wife through fencing. She wasn” a fencer, but she was the sister of one of my best friends on the team.

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