Jade Walker

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Natan Yonatan

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Categories: Writers/Editors

Natan Yonatan, an award-winning Israeli poet, died on March 12. Cause of death was not released. He was 81.
Born in Kiev, Ukraine, Yonatan immigrated to Israel when he was two years old. He earned a graduate degree in Hebrew and general literature from Tel Aviv University, and spent 27 years as the chief editor of the Sifriyat Poalim publishing house.
Yonatan published his first book of poetry in 1951. Nineteen others followed, which were translated into several languages. Although he often wrote about love, nature and war, Yonatan was best known for the poem, “That Man.” It was written to eulogize Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who was assassinated in 1995.
The winner of the 2001 Newman Prize for Hebrew Literature, Yonatan recently appeared in “Living in Conflict: Voices From Israel and Palestine,” a documentary about the 1973 Middle East war.

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Carol Conner

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Categories: Law

Carol Conner was a legal trailblazer who served as an icon to many young women in South Carolina.
A third-generation attorney, Connor served as a public defender in Richland County during the late-1970s. She spent five years as a Family Court judge, and became the state’s first female Circuit Court judge in 1988. Five years later, she was elected to the Appeals Court bench, another first for a woman in South Carolina.
Conner died on Feb. 20 from cancer. She was 54.

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Lawrence Ritter

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Categories: Business, Education, Sports, Writers/Editors

lritter.jpgLawrence Stanley Ritter, the author of the classic baseball book “The Glory of Their Times,” died on Feb. 15. Cause of death was not released. He was 81.
Ritter graduated from Indiana University and received a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin. He taught at Yale University and Michigan State University, worked as an economist and director of research at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and edited the Journal of Finance. From 1960 to 1991, he taught at New York University, serving as the chairman of the business school’s finance department. A research room and an endowed chair have been named in his honor.
Other than finance, Ritter had a passion for baseball and writing. In 1966, he received a $3,000 advance to write the book, “The Glory of Their Times.” For the next four years, he and his son traveled around the country, taping interviews with baseball players from the early part of the 20th century. The book sold more than 400,000 copies and was adapted into a documentary piece broadcast on PBS.
Ritter also wrote or co-wrote seven other baseball books, including “The Babe: A Life in Pictures,” “The 100 Greatest Baseball Players of All Time” and “Leagues Apart: The Men and Times of the Negro Baseball Leagues.”

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Jack Lundberg

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Categories: Misc.

John “Jack” Lundberg is believed to be one of the last surviving steelworkers who built the Empire State Building in New York City.
A member of Iron Workers Local 371, Lundberg helped erect the Chrysler building and Rockefeller Center in Manhattan and the John Hancock Tower in Boston. But he received requests for interviews from The Discovery Channel and the BBC about his work on the Empire State Building. Completed in 1931, the 102-story building was the world’s tallest skyscraper until the World Trade Center was constructed in the 1970s.
Born in Lexington, Mass., Lundberg traveled all over the country, moving when his work required it. He died on March 10 of natural causes at the age of 97.

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Doris Troy

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Categories: Musicians

dtroy.jpg Doris Troy, a singer, songwriter and actress who left an indelible mark on the music industry, died on Feb. 16 from emphysema. She was 67.
Born Doris Higginsen, the New York native spent her childhood singing in gospel groups. At 16, she worked as an usherette at the Apollo Theatre, a job that exposed her to some of the best black artists of the 1950s. Determined to enter the business herself, Troy began writing her own music. She joined the jazz group, The Halos, and sang as one half of Jay and Dee. Her first major songwriting success came in 1960 when “How About That,” was recorded by Dee Clark. It reached No. 33 on the Billboard pop chart and remained there for five weeks.
One of the first soul divas, Troy was often labeled in the press as a one-hit wonder for her 1963 R&B/pop crossover, “Just One Look.” But her vibrant, distinctive vocals accompanied numerous artists over the years. She sang with the Rolling Stones on “You Can’t Always Get What You Want,” Pink Floyd on “Dark Side of the Moon” and with Dusty Springfield on “In the Middle of Nowhere.” While touring Britain in 1965, she earned a devoted fan following; at the time her back-up band included a musician named Reginald Dwight (later known as Sir Elton John).
The Beatles signed Troy to their Apple label in 1969. Although her eponymous album featured the talents of Eric Clapton, Stephen Stills, Leon Russell and Ringo Starr, sales were disappointing. Her follow-up effort was a live gospel album recorded at the Rainbow Theatre in London.
Troy’s life story served as the inspiration for the 1981 gospel musical, “Mama, I Want to Sing.” The play, which was written by her sister Vy Higgensen and producer Ken Wydro, became the highest grossing off-Broadway show ever. It toured for 14 years in America and abroad, with Troy playing the role of her own mother. She later appeared in the musical, “Gospel Is

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