Jade Walker

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Max Manning

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Categories: Sports

mmanning.jpgMax Manning was a 6-foot-4-inch right-hander with the talent to possibly make it in the majors. He even got a call to tryout for the Detroit Tigers in 1937, an offer that was later rescinded when the team realized Manning was black.
Undeterred, Manning played for the Johnson Stars in Atlantic City and the Newark Eagles in the Negro National League.
After playing in Mexican and Canadian baseball leagues, he gave up the game, graduated from college and spent the next 28 years teaching the sixth grade.
Manning died on Monday. Cause of death was not released. He was 84.

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Marian Galvin Nuber

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Categories: Heroes

Marian Galvin Nuber was once a local hero.
In 1934, she received a Carnegie Hero Fund medal for rescuing a man from drowning in Long Lake near Port Orchard, Wash. The man’s canoe had capsized and as he struggled in the water, Nuber swam over to him and pulled him to safety — by his ear. She used the $500 prize money to attend art school but left early to marry Jim Galvin in 1937.
Galvin founded Galvin Flying Service in Seattle, which still operates out of Boeing Field. Ironically, Nuber didn’t like to fly.
Nuber died on June 14. Cause of death was not released. She was 94.

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Gregory J. White

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Categories: Medicine

Gregory J. White, a doctor who helped promote breastfeeding on a national scale, died on June 16 from complications of leukemia. He was 82.
Fifty years ago, Dr. White encouraged his wife, Mary, and her friends to form a support group for mothers who wanted to breastfeed their babies. At the time, bottlefeeding was the norm. Reader’s Digest wrote about the group and women from all over the U.S. wrote letters, asking for advice on the subject.
In 1956, Mary White founded La Leche League International, an organization that provides information about the benefits of breastfeeding. Dr. White served as a member of its professional advisory board for 46 years.
Dr. White also promoted home births, natural childbirth, the inclusion of fathers in the delivery room and the pro-life cause. He was the father of 11 children.

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Leon Uris

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Categories: Writers/Editors

Best-selling novelist Leon Uris died on Saturday of congestive heart failure. He was 78.
Uris wrote dozens of books, including spy thrillers, courtroom dramas and historical fiction, but he was best known for “Exodus,” which was published in 1958 and adapted into a film starring Paul Newman.
Dr. Wladislav Dering, who was identified as a war criminal in “Exodus,” sued Uris for libel. A London court ruled in Dering’s favor in 1964, but awarded him minimal damages.
HarperCollins will publish Uris’ latest book, “O’Hara’s Choice,” in October.

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