Categotry Archives: Business

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Annie Miller

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Categories: Business

Alligator Annie, the Cajun naturalist and professional snake handler, has given her last tour of the Louisiana swamps.
Born on the Bayou Black River, Miller grew up in a family of trappers. She continued the trade after marrying Eddie Miller and raising two boys, sometimes catching up to 200 snakes a day to sell to zoos and laboratories. The couple also tamed otters, two of which were later sold to Walt Disney Productions and featured in the films “An Otter in the Family” and “A Day in Teton Marsh.”
In 1979, the Millers founded the state’s first swamp boat tour business. Annie’s nickname was born from her knowledge and love of alligators. During tours, she’d call the creatures to the boat and point out each animal’s special markings.
Her work on the swamps earned her an award from the Louisiana Department of Culture, Recreation and Tourism, and led officials in Terrebonne Parish to declare sections of the marsh and bayous as alligator preserves. In 1991, she was named the state’s Minority and Woman Business Person of the Year. “Alligator Annie, The Biography of Annie Miller,” by Deborah Rose Burton, was published last year.
Annie Miller died on Feb. 2 from heart disease. She was 89.

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Maxwell Starkman

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Categories: Business, Military

Maxwell Starkman, the architect who designed the Museum of Tolerance in Los Angeles, died on Jan. 5 from natural causes. He was 82.
The Toronto-native joined the Royal Canadian Engineers and spent World War II serving in England, France, Belgium and Germany before returning to Canada to earn his architecture degree at the University of Manitoba. After graduation, Starkman moved to Los Angeles and worked for Richard J. Neutra, the grandfather of contemporary architecture in California.
In 1953, Starkman and architect Fritz Reichl formed their own firm, Reichl and Starkman Architects. When Riechl died a few years later, the company changed its name to Maxwell Starkman & Associates and began designing tract homes during Southern California’s post-war housing boom. Over the next three decades, Starkman built thousands of single-family homes and apartment complexes, shopping centers, office buildings, luxury condominiums and hotels.
His firm, which was ranked in the Top 100 in Engineering News Record, also designed Sony Pictures Plaza in Culver City, Calif., and the 36,000-square-foot Holocaust museum.

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Dorotha Randall Howe

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Categories: Business, Medicine, Religious Leaders

When Coloradoans voted to deny Medicaid funding for abortions in 1984, Dorotha Randall Howe founded the Freedom Fund, a local program that helps poor women pay for the medical procedure. The fund, which is maintained by the First Universalist Church of Denver, aids more than 100 women a year.
As the owner of Abortion Information and Referral, Howe also spent a decade counseling thousands of women on their family planning options. For her many years of service to the community, she received the Faith and Freedom Award from the Colorado chapter of the Religious Coalition for Reproductive Choice in 1988, and the Clara Barton Award in 1997 from the Unitarian-Universalist Women’s Federation.
“She did abortion counseling before abortion was legal. She wasn’t a flag-waver, but she always was a feminist and was very interested in women’s issues,” said her daughter, Judith Howe Klopfer.
Howe died on Jan. 1. Cause of death was not released. She was 86.

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Enric Bernat Fontlladosa

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Categories: Business

Enric Bernat Fontlladosa, the Catalan creator of the world-famous Chupa Chups lollipop, died on Dec. 27. Cause of death was not released. He was 80.
A third-generation candy maker, Bernat took over an ailing Spanish confectioner, renamed it Chupa Chups and cancelled most of its 200 other products in order to focus on one item: the lollipop. The flower-shaped candy on a stick debuted in 1958 featuring a logo designed by artist Salvador Dali.
To tempt children, Chupa Chups asked shopkeepers to place the lollipops near the cash register. At the time, candy was kept in glass jars behind the counters. The new product placement worked. Within five years, Chupa Chups lollipops were sold at more than 300,000 outlets in Spain.
In the 1980s, Chupa Chups began selling the candy all over the world. Today, 90 percent of its sales are abroad. Factories in five countries produce 4 billion lollipops a year. They’re available in 50 flavors.

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David Bale

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Categories: Business

South African-born entrepreneur David Bale was both a commercial pilot and a skateboard importer, but he was best known as a passionate activist of human and animal rights.

Bale used his piloting skills to provide air rescue and food supplies to needy communities in Africa. He served as a board member of The Dian Fossey Gorilla Fund, an organization dedicated to the conservation and protection of gorillas; and supported the Ark Trust, an animal rights group that recently became the Hollywood office of the Humane Society of the United States. In 2002, Bale exposed how marine scientists were cruelly branding seals for tracking purposes on the syndicated television show, “Celebrity Justice.”

“David went through the world with few possessions and great empathy for all living things. He had the greatest heart of anyone I’ve ever known,” stated his wife, feminist author Gloria Steinem.

Bale, 62, died on Dec. 30 from brain lymphoma. He leaves behind four children, including actor Christian Bale.

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