Categotry Archives: Business

by

Takashi Sonobe

No comments yet

Categories: Business

tsonobe.jpgTakashi Sonobe, the chairman of the Mitsubishi Motors Corp., died on Oct. 28 from heart failure. He was 62.
Sonobe graduated with an economics degree from Keio University in 1964, then joined Shin Mitsubishi Heavy-Industries Ltd. When Mitsubishi Motors was spun off in 1970, Sonobe transferred to the new company and spent the next three decades working in the office of international business.
He was working as the managing director and corporate general manager in the automaker’s office of North American Car Operations in 2000 when the company’s president resigned in disgrace. Sonobe replaced him, served for two years, then was promoted to chairman of the board.

by

Jim Albrecht

No comments yet

Categories: Business

James W. Albrecht, the former tournament director of the World Series of Poker, died on Oct. 16. Cause of death was not released. He was 53.
Albrecht studied math and engineering at Florida State University. He moved to Las Vegas in 1971 and attended dealer’s school in order to get a job dealing blackjack at the Carousel Casino. He later worked as a dealer at the Jackpot Casino and at the Golden Nugget, then became poker room manager at the Mint.
In 1988, when the Mint merged with the Horseshoe, Albrecht was named director of the World Series of Poker. He held that position for a decade and helped popularize the game by having the series aired on television.
The founder of Poker Consultants Inc., Albrecht also directed the United States Poker Championship in Atlantic City and Jack Binion’s World Poker Open in Tunica, Miss. He later served as a consultant on the films, “Rounders” and “Maverick,” and for the Discovery Channel show, “High Rollers.”

by

Charles Seabrook

5 comments

Categories: Business

Without the Seabrook family, tasty frozen vegetables wouldn’t have been possible.

Charles Courtney Seabrook was only 20 years old when he teamed up with his father and two brothers to develop a method of freezing fresh vegetables for mass distribution.

By packing veggies in wood boxes filled with dry ice, they found that the frozen contents tasted better when cooked days later. The family took their processing idea to Clarence Birdseye for refinement and mass production in 1930. The resulting frozen foodstuffs were so successful that the family expanded their New Jersey property into the largest irrigated vegetable farm in the world.

Despite the family’s success, an internal dispute in the mid-1950s split control of the company. Seabrook eventually sold the business to Seeman Bros. Inc., a New York wholesale grocery business.

Seabrook died on Oct. 4. Cause of death was not released. He was 94.

by

Jackie Flosso

5 comments

Categories: Business

Jackie Flosso, the magician who owned the Flosso-Hornmann Magic Company in New York City, died on Sept. 28 of kidney and heart ailments. He was 77.
Flosso’s grandfather was the famous magician, Louis “Pops” Kreiger, and his father was Al Flosso, a.k.a. the Coney Island Fakir. Al bought the magic shop from magician Frank Ducrot in 1939, and when he died in 1976, Jackie inherited the store. He ran the business until 2000.
The cluttered shop was opened in 1872 by Francis and Antonio Martinka. It was so popular with the illusionist community that the Society of American Magicians was founded there. Harry Houdini, the first president of the SAM, was once a part-owner of the store.

by

Franco Modigliani

3 comments

Categories: Business, Education

Franco Modigliani, a Nobel Prize-winning economist, died on Sept. 25. Cause of death was not released. He was 85.
Modigliani was born in Italy. He studied economics and law at the University of Rome, but was forced to immigrate to the United States at the beginning of World War II to avoid religious and political persecution.
He received a doctorate in social science at the New School for Social Research in New York, joined the Cowles Commission for Research in Economics, then taught at the Carnegie Institute of Technology. There he developed his best-known work, the life-cycle hypothesis.
He joined the faculty of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1961. During his three decades at the university, Modigliani developed a reputation as a world-class economist for his writings on inflation and public deficits.
In 1985, Modigliani won the Nobel Prize in economics for researching how people save for retirement and how the market value of businesses is determined. He was also the former president of the American Economic Association, and the author of the autobiography, “The Adventures of an Economist.”

1 2 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28