Categotry Archives: Business

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Robert Kardashian

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Categories: Business, Law

Robert Kardashian, an attorney who represented O.J. Simpson during his infamous murder trial, died on Sept. 30 from cancer of the esophagus. He was 59.

On June 16, 1994, Simpson spent the night at Kardashian’s home. In the morning, he was supposed to turn himself in to authorities and face charges of stabbing his wife, Nicole Brown, and waiter Ron Goldman, to death. Instead, Simpson and his friend Al Cowlings led police on a slow-speed chase that ended at Simpson’s Brentwood home. He was eventually arrested and charged with the killings.

Kardashian served as one of the attorneys on Simpson’s defense team, which won a “not guilty” verdict on Oct. 3, 1995. Simpson was found liable for the killings in a civil trial, and was ordered to pay $33.5 million in damages.

Kardashian later shared his doubts of Simpson’s innocence on the ABCNews show “20/20,” and in the book, “American Tragedy: The Uncensored Story of the Simpson Defense” by Lawrence Schiller and James Willwerth. The book was also adapted into a TV mini-series.

Kardashian graduated from the University of Southern California in 1962. He earned a law degree from the University of San Diego and practiced law for about a decade before leaving the field to work in business. He and Simpson were friends for over 25 years. They lived together in the 1970s and started Juice Inc., a corporation that owned and operated several frozen yogurt shops.

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Bernard Manischewitz

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Categories: Business

Bernard Manischewitz, the last generation to run his family’s kosher foods empire, died on Sept. 20 from heart disease. He was 89.
Manischewitz was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, the place where his grandfather founded the kosher foods company, B. Manischewitz, in 1888. Rabbi Dov Behr Manischewitz built a small bakery where he baked matzo, the unleavened bread Jews eat at Passover based on a 5,000-year-old recipe. By 1932, the business had expanded to a second plant in Jersey City, N.J., which eventually became the company’s base of operations.
Bernard Manischewitz graduated from New York University and joined the family business in the 1940s. Although his father initially put him on the production line, Manischewitz worked his way up to president and chief operating officer by the time he was 29. He expanded the company’s line of foods beyond basic kosher products, then sold the business in 1991 for $124 million.

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Barbara Jarmoluk

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Categories: Business

Barbara Furlong Jarmoluk, a dog lover and judge for the American Kennel Club, died on Aug. 10 of ovarian cancer. She was 72.
She married Mike Jarmoluk, a defensive tackle with the Philadelphia Eagles, in 1949, the year the Eagles won the National Football League championship. While her husband played football, Jarmoluk built a kennel in Glenside, Penn., and raised long-haired dachshunds and Doberman pinschers.
As a professional handler, Jarmoluk trained other people’s show dogs for competition. When she reached the top of her field, the American Kennel Association hired her to travel the world and preside over dog shows.

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Rand Brooks

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Categories: Actors, Business, Hollywood

rbrooks.jpgRand Brooks, a veteran actor who appeared in over 75 movies, died on Sept. 1. Cause of death was not released. He was 84.
Brooks acted in half a dozen films during the 1930s, but his big break came when he landed the role of Charles Hamilton, Scarlett O’Hara’s doomed first husband in “Gone With the Wind.”
Over the next three decades, Brooks achieved some fame as Lucky Jenkins in 12 Hopalong Cassidy westerns, and as Cpl. Randy Boone in the TV show, “Rin Tin Tin.” He also did guest spots on “The Lone Ranger,” “Maverick” and “Perry Mason.”
Brooks eventually left show business to build the largest private ambulance service in Los Angeles County. After he sold the company in 1984, Brooks retired to the Santa Ynez Valley and bred champion Andalusian horses.
IMDb Filmography

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Chester Lindsey

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Categories: Business

Chester L. Lindsey, the architect of Seattle’s tallest building, died on Aug. 16. Cause of death was not released. He was 76.
Lindsey spent two years in the Army, graduated with an architecture and structural engineering degree from Washington State University, then opened the firm, Chester Lindsey & Associates.
He worked on numerous buildings in Seattle, including shopping centers, office buildings and the Fourth and Blanchard structure, which has been locally labeled the “Darth Vader” building. He was best known for designing the 76-story Columbia Seafirst Center, which is now the Bank of America Tower.

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