Categotry Archives: Law

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Harold St. John

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Categories: Law, Politicians

Sir Harold Bernard “Bree” St. John, the former prime minister of Barbados, died on Feb. 29 from cancer. He was 72.
St. John studied law at London University, passed the bar and practiced in Barbados and the eastern Caribbean. He joined the Barbados Labour Party (BLP) in 1959 then was appointed to the Senate as an opposition representative.
For the next three decades, St. John dedicated himself to public service. When Barbados declared its independence from Great Britain in 1966, he was elected to the House of Assembly. He held several Cabinet positions in the 1970s, including deputy prime minister, minister of trade and industry and minister of tourism. He also spent less than a year as the nation’s prime minister.
The BLP regained power in 1994, and St. John became the country’s deputy prime minister under Owen Arthur. He was knighted that same year.

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John Jones

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Categories: Law

During his 25-year career with the U.S. Secret Service, John Paul Jones protected four presidents — Dwight D. Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson and Richard M. Nixon. He guarded both world leaders and presidential families. In 1960, he even drove First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy to the hospital so she could give birth to her son, John Jr.
An Eagle Scout, Jones served in Korea with the U.S. Army. He earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from Kent State University and a master’s in public administration from the University of New Mexico. Jones became an agent in 1955, and handled assignments out of St. Louis, Washington, San Antonio, Austin and Louisville. He was working in New Mexico in 1963 when JFK was assassinated.
Jones, who later served as the head of the Albuquerque bureau before retiring in 1979, died on March 3 from pancreatic cancer. He was 75.

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Boris Trajkovski

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Categories: Law, Politicians, Religious Leaders

btrajkovski.jpgBoris Trajkovski, the president of Macedonia, died on Feb. 26 in a plane crash. He was 47.
An ordained Methodist minister, Trajkovski studied theology in the United States and gave up Communism. He earned a law degree from St. Cyril and Methodius University then specialized in commercial and employment law. He spent 17 years as the head of the legal department of construction company Sloboda before he dedicated his life to public service.
Trajkovski worked as chief-of-office in the Skopje government administration for two years until he was appointed deputy foreign minister of Macedonia. Elected president in 1999, Trajkovski was credited with uniting his ethnically divided country. He pledged to lead Macedonia towards membership in the European Union and NATO, and was only days away from signing the formal EU application.
Trajkovski was en route to an international investment conference when his plane crashed 50 miles south of Sarajevo. Six other officials and two pilots also died. The Parliament speaker, Ljubco Jordanovski, will serve as acting president until the next election.

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Marty Jurow

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Categories: Hollywood, Law, Writers/Editors

Martin Jurow, a successful Hollywood agent and producer, died on Feb. 12. Cause of death was not released. He was 92.
The New York native always had a passion for acting. As a child, he staged backyard productions of vaudeville and never missed a Saturday matinee at the movies. But he soon realized his talents were more suited to the business side of Broadway and Hollywood productions. So he studied drama at the College of William and Mary and graduated from Harvard Law School in 1935. Jurow worked as an entertainment lawyer with the New York law firm of Nathan Burkan, then moved to California, where he trained under Jack L. Warner, a co-founder of Warner Bros. Pictures, and Hal B. Wallis, the producer of “Casablanca.”
Jurow began producing his own movies in 1959, starting with the Gary Cooper western, “The Hanging Tree.” Over the next three decades, he would produce numerous box office hits, including “Breakfast at Tiffany’s,” “The Pink Panther,” “The Great Race” and “Terms of Endearment.” He became a top-level agent for MCA and the William Morris Agency and worked on the Broadway productions of “My Fair Lady,” “Oklahoma!,” “South Pacific,” “The King and I” and “Guys and Dolls.”
Jurow relocated to Dallas in the 1970s and decided to go back to law school. Upon graduation, he passed the Texas bar and became an assistant district attorney. In the final years of his life, he taught a filmmaking class at Southern Methodist University and hosted the radio show, “Martin Jurow of Show Business” on KAAM 770. His experiences in Hollywood were chronicled in the 2001 memoir, “Marty Jurow Seein’ Stars: A Show Biz Odyssey.”

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Waggoner Carr

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Categories: Law, Military, Politicians, Writers/Editors

Waggoner Carr, a former Texas attorney general and state representative, died on Feb. 25 from cancer. He was 85.
Carr graduated from Texas Technological College and was studying for a law degree at the University of Texas Law School when World War II began. He served for three years as an Army Air Corps pilot then returned home to complete his law degree and open a private firm with his brother, Warlick.
Over the next two decades, Carr dedicated his life to public service. He spent two years as the Lubbock assistant district attorney, three years as a Lubbock County attorney and a decade as a state representative. From 1957 to 1961, he was the speaker of the House.
Carr was elected the attorney general of Texas in 1963. On the morning of Nov. 22, he ate breakfast with President John F. Kennedy before flying to the Panhandle for a speaking engagement. While he was en route, President Kennedy was shot and killed. Carr later testified before the Warren Commission, which investigated the assassination.
After two unsuccessful campaigns for the U.S. Senate and governor’s office, Carr returned to private practice. In 1971, he was tried on federal fraud and conspiracy charges for the Sharpstown stock fraud scandal, but was eventually acquitted. The author of the 1977 memoir, “Waggoner Carr, Not Guilty,” he was writing books on Jesse James and a history of Texas attorneys general when he died.

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