Categotry Archives: Law

by

Kelley Green

1 comment

Categories: Law

Kelley Green, the aptly named environmentalist who was beloved by inner-city youths and the tree-hugging community for her philanthropic endeavors, died on Aug. 20 of uterine cancer. She was 57.
Green graduated from Wellesley College and George Washington University Law School. She clerked for U.S. District Judge Frank M. Johnson, then spent two years as a deputy associate attorney general. The money she received for her legal prowess was appealing, but Green needed more. So she moved to Boulder, Colo., and spent the next 20 years trying to save the environment.
She founded the environmental law and advocacy organization, the Land and Water Fund of the Rockies (now known as Western Resource Advocates) in 1989. When her parents died, she used her inheritance to found the Green Fund, which anonymously supports a variety of environmental and educational causes. In 1997, Green launched Earth Walk, a program that exposes fourth, fifth and sixth graders living in the inner-city to the wonders of nature.
“She went from a hard-nosed, hard-driving Carter-administration civil rights lawyer to a hard-nosed, hard-driving environmental lawyer and advocate. The natural world was her connection back to herself after her years back in Washington, D.C. She devoted herself to trying to protect it,” said Maggie Fox, deputy executive director of the Sierra Club.

by

Burton Lewis Hutchings

No comments yet

Categories: Law, Military

Burton Lewis Hutchings, a retired officer of the Central Intelligence Agency, died on Aug. 20 of cancer. He was 67.

Hutchings graduated from the University of Michigan with a law degree, then completed an intensive course in Mandarin Chinese at the Institute of Far Eastern Languages at Yale University. With this knowledge, he got a job as a communications intelligence specialist with the Air Force Security Service and served in Korea.

In 1965, Hutchings joined the CIA. During his 24 years with the agency, Hutchings worked as chief of the legislative division in the director’s office and as chief of operations of the counterterrorism component. When he retired, Hutchings handled security for Trans World Airlines in London, the Port Authority of New York and CBS.

by

Arthur Helton

1 comment

Categories: Extraordinary People, Law, Politicians

ahelton.jpgArthur C. Helton, an author and activist who defended the rights of refugees, died on Aug. 19 in the car bombing of the United Nations headquarters in Baghdad. He was 54.
Helton was meeting with U.N. envoy Sérgio Vieira de Mello when the bomb exploded. Vieira de Mello and 18 others were also killed.
Helton was a law professor at Columbia University who devoted 12 years to working with the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights. He defended Haitians seeking asylum in the U.S., and often testified as an expert in court and in Congress on migrants’ rights.
“People now talk about how refugee rights are human rights. Arthur was in the forefront of promoting that idea. He was one of the first people, if not the first, working at a human rights organization with an exclusive focus on refugee protection and the protection of displaced people. He was a major force in building concern for refugees first in the U.S. and then he took that concern international,” said Michael Posner, executive director of the Lawyers Committee for Human Rights.
Since 1999, Helton has served as the program director of peace and conflict studies at the Council on Foreign Relations. He was in Baghdad to assess humanitarian conditions in Iraq for a series of articles he was planning to write for openDemocracy, an online news agency.

by

William Orrick

No comments yet

Categories: Law

William H. Orrick, the federal judge who sentenced Patty Hearst, died in his sleep on Aug. 15. He was 87.
Orrick attended Yale and the law school on the University of California, Berkeley campus. He served as a counter-intelligence officer in the Pacific and Europe during World War II, then worked for his father’s law firm, Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe.
Orrick spent the 1960s working for the Justice Department in Washington D.C., and in 1974 was appointed to the Federal District Court in San Francisco by President Richard M. Nixon.
When one of his colleagues died, Orrick inherited the Patty Hearst case. Hearst, who was convicted of robbing a bank with the people who kidnapped her, was sentenced by Orrick to seven years in prison in 1977. Her sentence was commuted by President Jimmy Carter less than two years later; President Bill Clinton pardoned her. Orrick also presided over a 23-year school desegregation case and a civil rights suit challenging conditions at San Francisco’s jail in San Bruno.

by

John Lansdale Jr.

1 comment

Categories: Law, Military

Col. John Lansdale Jr., the security and intelligence chief of the Manhattan Project, died on Aug. 22. Cause of death was not released. He was 91.
Lansdale graduated from the Virginia Military Institute in 1933 and received his law degree from Harvard Law School. He worked for the Cleveland law firm of Squire, Sanders & Dempsey until the start of World War II.
From 1941 to 1945, Lansdale ran the investigation and review branches of the G-2 War Department. He also took command of the security and intelligence teams of the Manhattan Project, which developed the first atomic bomb in Los Alamos, N.M. For his contributions to the war effort, Lansdale received the Legion of Merit and the Order of the British Empire.
After the war, Lansdale returned to Cleveland, where he practiced law and served on the city council for Shaker Heights, Ohio.

1 2 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20