Categotry Archives: Law

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Thomas Keough

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Categories: Law

Lt. Thomas M. Keough was the kind of homicide detective usually only found in good mystery novels.
A third-generation Chicago police officer, Keough spent 32 years on the force and received more than 100 awards from the department during his career, including 12 commendations.
His cases were varied and tough, but Keough always managed to get to the heart of each one. He helped solve the homicide of two children who were killed by their parents in 1986. He worked on the task force that shut down a drug dealing family. And he once solved a murder based on the examination of a single crime scene photo (the killer left his watch on the victim’s night stand).
Keough died July 3 of an apparent heart attack. He was 53.

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Dean Dunlavey

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Categories: Law

Dean C. Dunlavey, the Los Angeles trial lawyer who won consumers the right to tape TV shows on their VCRs, died Saturday from complications of a fall. He was 77.
Dunlavey graduated at the top of his class from the University of California, Berkeley in 1955. He was the editor-in-chief of the California Law Review and served as a member of the Order of the Coif.
He taught at Harvard Law School, and earned a master’s of law degree, then joined the Los Angeles law firm Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher in 1956. He tried nearly 100 cases in his 34-year legal career, but the most important one was Sony Corp. of America vs. Universal City Studios Inc. (a.k.a. the Betamax case).
In the early ’80s, Universal City Studios and Walt Disney Productions were granted an injunction against Sony, the manufacturer who sold Betamax video recorders. Universal and Disney claimed the VCR infringed on the copyrights of Hollywood studios because it allowed consumers to record their favorite TV shows.
The case went to the Supreme Court where Dunlavey contended that greed was behind the law suit. He said the movie studios were paid to air their TV shows and were not entitled to further compensation by the consumer.
In a 5-4 decision, the court ruled that consumers do not violate federal copyright law when they tape TV shows for their own use, and that the makers of VCRs were not breaking any laws by selling such products to the public.

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Dick Iglehart

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Categories: Law

Richard B. “Dick” Iglehart dedicated his life to keeping criminals off the streets.
Iglehart attended the University of California, Berkeley, and the Santa Clara University Law School and then joined the Alameda County District Attorney’s office.
When Iglehart was appointed to chief assistant district attorney, he vowed to prosecute drunken drivers to the letter of the law. He headed a panel dedicated to finding better ways to prevent, investigate and prosecute child abuse. And he helped to draft a ban on assault-style guns shortly after Patrick Purdy killed five children and wounded 29 during a school massacre.
In his career, Iglehart prosecuted more than 120 cases ranging from serial murder, rape and child molestation to political corruption. In January 2000, Iglehart became a Superior Court Judge in Alameda County, Calif., a position he held until his death.
He died of an apparent heart attack on Tuesday. He was 61.

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Chuck Carroll

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Categories: Law, Sports

Charles O. “Chuck” Carroll, was both a revered football player and a veteran prosecutor in King County, Wash.
Nicknamed the “Iron Man,” Carroll was a 195-pound running back on the University of Washington football team. He scored 17 touchdowns in 1928, a record that wasn’t beaten for 58 years. Carroll was inducted into the National Football Foundation Hall of Fame in 1964, and his jersey number (No. 2) was retired by the school.
He earned a law degree from Washington in 1932 and was appointed King County prosecutor in 1948. He spent several decades in public service until being indicted for his alleged connection to a Seattle police scandal.
Officers were accused of taking bribes and Carroll was charged with failing to vigorously prosecute police corruption. A judge dismissed the indictment, but it cost Carroll politically. He lost the Republican nomination for prosecutor in 1970, and returned to private law practice until 1985.
Carroll died on Monday. Cause of death was not released. He was 96.

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