Categotry Archives: Law

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Fanny Goldstein

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Categories: Law

Fanny Goldstein was the first mother to pass the Pennsylvania bar exam.
The Ukrainian-born trailblazer moved to South Philadelphia in 1905. She earned a bachelor’s degree in education from the University of Pennsylvania at a time when few women attended college. She married real estate developer Isaac Goldstein a year later, and gave birth to a daughter, Lois.
Goldstein earned a law degree from Temple University in 1932. She was the only woman in her class. Specializing in real estate law, she worked with her husband until the 1950s then focused on family mediation. Goldstein later toured the country, giving lectures that promoted social equality for women and civil rights. She was also a leader in the World Jewish Congress on Zionism.
Goldstein died on June 6 from complications of a hip injury. She was 102.

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Arthur Bischoff

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Categories: Law

During his four decades on the force, Lt. Arthur R. Bischoff arrested many criminals and delivered several babies.
The Chicago native enlisted in the Air Force at the start of the Korean War. He trained as a mechanic and played football at Eglin Air Force Base in Florida before shipping off to Japan and Korea. Upon his return to the states in 1957, he joined the Chicago Police Department.
As a rookie, Bischoff worked the patrol wagon, transporting criminals and handling standard police calls. It was during those early years that he helped deliver five babies, either at their homes or in the back of the wagon, when the mothers couldn’t get to the hospital in time.
In the 1960s, Bischoff joined the city’s first tactical unit as a plainclothes officer. He arrested pickpockets and robbers downtown, stopped jumpers from committing suicide and helped maintain order during the demonstrations outside the 1968 Democratic National Convention. When the protests turned violent, the police began tossing tear gas into the streets and beating protestors and reporters. Bischoff was charged with hitting Chicago Sun-Times photographer Duane R. Hall, but a jury later acquitted him. Before retiring in 1996, he escorted dignitaries as part of the traffic division and served as the acting commander of the mass transit unit.
Bischoff died on June 18 of a blood clot on the brain. He was 72.

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Francisco Ortiz

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Categories: Law, Media, Writers/Editors

Francisco Javier Ortiz Franco, an editor and co-founder of Zeta, a weekly newsmagazine in Tijuana, was assassinated on June 22. He was 47.
Ortiz was sitting in his car with his two young children when a masked gunman approached the vehicle and fired four bullets into his face and neck. The children were not wounded.
Ortiz helped launch Zeta in 1980, and was a member of its editorial board for the past 16 years. A practicing attorney, he wrote the legal affairs column “To Start With,” and edited articles about drug trafficking, people smuggling and political corruption that were written by the paper’s top editor, J. Jesús Blancornelas.
Seven years ago, Blancornelas barely survived a machine-gun assault by suspected drug traffickers; he currently has round-the-clock protection. Hector Felix Miranda, another founder of Zeta, was murdered in 1988.
Journalists all over the world have condemned the slaying of Ortiz. On June 24, dozens of reporters and editors demonstrated in Tijuana, demanding that authorities solve the case, make an arrest and prevent future acts of intimidation on members of the media.

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Max Rosenberg

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Categories: Hollywood, Law

Fans of supernatural, horror and suspense movies are mourning the loss of Max Rosenberg, a Hollywood filmmaker who specialized in creepy cinema.
For over half a century, Rosenberg produced dozens of movies, including “The Curse of Frankenstein,” “The City of the Dead,” “The House That Dripped Blood,” “Cat People” and “Tales From the Crypt.” Most of these features were low- or modestly-budgeted, yet fostered the careers of young actors like Donald Sutherland and Terrance Stamp.
Before he delved into the dark and mysterious, Rosenberg produced the early rock ‘n’ roll movie, “Rock, Rock, Rock,” which featured an appearance by disc jockey Alan Freed. He and his partner, Milton Subotsky, also created “Junior Science,” an award-winning TV series for children.
A New York native, Rosenberg graduated from City College of New York and St. John Law School. He worked as a lawyer before entering the film business in 1939 as a distributor of foreign films. In the mid-1950s, Rosenberg switched to producing and eventually formed his own company, Rearguard Productions.
Rosenberg died on June 14. Cause of death was not released. He was 89.

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Betty Hallanan

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Categories: Law

bhallanan.jpgElizabeth Virginia Hallanan, the first female judge in West Virginia, died on June 8 of complications related to emphysema. She was 79.

Hallanan earned a bachelor’s degree from Morris Harvey College, and a law degree from West Virginia University law school. After eight years in private practice, she served one term on the West Virginia State Board of Education and two years in the West Virginia House of Delegates.

In 1959, Hallanan became the first woman to be appointed to a judgeship in West Virginia when she was named to Juvenile Court in Kanawha County. She also was the first chairwoman of the state’s Public Service Commission.

President Ronald Reagan called Hallanan in 1983, and appointed her to the federal bench. Until her death, she worked as a U.S. District Court judge for the Southern District of West Virginia. A controversial jurist, Hallanan made headlines when she threw out the state’s mandatory school prayer law in 1984, stating that “a hoax, conceived in political expediency, has been perpetrated upon those sincere citizens of West Virginia.” She received more than 1,000 letters protesting her ruling.

In honor of her dedication to public service, the Sunday Gazette-Mail chose Hallanan as its West Virginian of the Year in 1997.

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