Categotry Archives: Media

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Gregory L. Walker

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Categories: Media

Gregory L. Walker, a top sports-photography executive at Getty Images, died on Aug. 31 of an apparent suicide. He was 37.
Walker went to work on Aug. 31, sent a few e-mails to friends and colleagues, called 911, waited for police to arrive then jumped off the fifth floor of the Getty Images office building in Santa Monica, Calif. He died a short time later.
Walker founded AllSport and turned it into the world’s largest sports photo media agency. He sold it to Getty Images in 1998 for $51.1 million and was hired as an executive vice president.
In his spare time, Walker served on the Los Angeles Triathalon Committee.

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Dick Darcey

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Categories: Media

Richard Darcey, an award-winning photographer for The Washington Post, died on Sept. 2 of pneumonia. He was 74.

Darcey landed his first job in journalism in 1948 when he was hired as a copy boy for the Washington Times-Herald. Within two years, the newspaper brought him on as a full-time staff photographer.

Darcey had to give up the job during the Korean War to serve the Air Force as a photographer in Greenland. His replacement at the paper was Jacqueline Bouvier, who interviewed Sen. John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts. She later became Kennedy’s wife and the First Lady.

When Darcey returned to the states in 1955, he joined The Washington Post. In his three decades at the daily, Darcey shot pictures of every major sport. His images won top awards from the White House Press Photographers Association and appeared in Sports Illustrated, Look and Life magazines.

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Jerry Frutkoff

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Categories: Media

Gerald “Jerry” Frutkoff, a veteran horse racing photographer, died on Aug. 1 from cancer and kidney disease. He was 81.
A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Frutkoff joined the Navy after high school and served as an aviation boatswain’s mate during World War II. When his tour ended, Frutkoff went to Florida to work in his uncle’s photo shop. In 1947, he moved to Maryland and became a freelance photographer.
For more than five decades, Frutkoff used his camera to capture the personalities and triumphs of horse racing. His work appeared in numerous magazines, including Life, The Saturday Evening Post and Sports Illustrated. His shot of stakes winner Irish Course sitting in the starting gate at Laurel earned him the prestigious Thoroughbred Racing Association’s press photo award in 1968. It later appeared on the back cover of Life magazine.
Frutkoff photographed 55 of the last 56 Preakness Stakes, missing only the 1973 race when he filled in for a colleague at another track. Secretariat won the Triple Crown that year.
In 2000, Frutkoff received the Humphrey S. Finney Award for his lifetime contributions to horse racing. To honor his memory, the Maryland Jockey Club will rename its annual award for the best shot from the Preakness to the “Jerry Frutkoff Preakness Photography Award.”

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Robert J. Donovan

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Categories: Education, Media, Writers/Editors

Robert John Donovan, a veteran journalist and author, died on Aug. 8 from complications of a stroke. He was 90.
After graduating from high school, Donovan made $7 a week as a night copy boy for the Buffalo Courier Express. Four years later, he became a reporter for The New York Herald Tribune and covered city hall. During World War II, Donovan wrote for the armed services newspaper, Stars and Stripes, then went back to the Herald Tribune to report on national and political stories in Washington D.C. In 1963, Donovan was hired by the Los Angeles Times to man its Washington bureau.
Donovan covered five presidential administrations and broke many major news stories. He followed the 1948 Harry S. Truman-Thomas E. Dewey campaign, rode in the presidential motorcade in Dallas when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated and broke the story of the U.S. troop withdrawal from Vietnam in 1969 (his story was published before President Nixon had officially announced the event).
Donovan also wrote 13 books, including “PT-109,” a best-seller about President Kennedy’s war experiences. It was published in 1961 and made into a movie starring Cliff Robertson. Donovan’s memoir, “Boxing the Kangaroo,” was published in 2000.

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John Selover

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Categories: Media

John Lewis Selover, publisher of the Christian Science Monitor, died on Aug. 1. Cause of death was not released. He was 72.
The son of Christian Scientists, Selover became a Christian Science practitioner (spiritual healer) in 1975. He worked as the church’s manager of community and public affairs during the 1970s, and was elected to the Christian Science board of directors in the 1980s.
In 1998, Selover was named manager of the Christian Science Publishing Society, which publishes the Christian Science Monitor in Boston. During his tenure as publisher, the daily newspaper won a Pulitzer Prize for its political cartoons and expanded its online presence.

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