Categotry Archives: Media

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Harold Schonberg

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Categories: Media, Musicians

Harold Charles Schonberg, a Pulitzer Prize-winning music critic for The New York Times, died on July 26. Cause of death was not released. He was 87.
Schonberg took his first trip to the Metropolitan Opera when he was 11. That night he decided he wanted to become a music critic when he grew up. Almost four decades later, he devoted a Sunday column to his recollections of that evening.
As an undergraduate at Brooklyn College, Schonberg published his first reviews in the Musical Advance. He attended grad school at New York University and wrote a master’s thesis on the musical and literary significance of Elizabethan songbooks.
In 1939, Schonberg became a record critic for American Music Lover magazine, a publication that was later renamed the American Record Guide. His career was placed on hold during World War II when he served as a code breaker and parachutist in the United States Army Airborne Signal Corps.
When the war ended, Schonberg returned to New York City and took a job as a music critic for The New York Sun. He also contributed reviews to the Musical Courier, Musical Digest and Gramophone.
Schonberg joined The New York Times in 1950 and became its record editor five years later. By 1960, he was promoted to senior music critic, a position he held for two decades. Schonberg wrote daily reviews and longer Sunday features on opera and classical music. In 1971, he won the Pulitzer Prize for criticism. It was the first time the award was given to a music critic.
Schonberg also had a passion for writing about chess and literature. He covered the Boris Spassky-Bobby Fischer championship match in Reykjavik, Iceland, in 1972, and the championship match between Garry Kasparov and Anatoly Karpov in 1984. From 1972 to 1995, Schonberg reviewed mysteries and thrillers for The New York Times Book Review under the pseudonym Newgate Callendar.
Schonberg also published 13 books, including “The Great Pianists,” “The Lives of the Great Composers” and “Facing the Music,” a collection of his favorite columns.

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Bryant Snapp

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Categories: Media

Bryant Davis Snapp, the editorial page copy chief at The Washington Post, died on July 22 in a head-on collision with a water tanker near Toledo, Wash. He was 36.

Snapp was the editor-in-chief of the student newspaper at the University of Virginia, then spent nine years copyediting The Washington Times. He joined The Washington Post in 1999 as a deputy copy editor on the national news desk, and was later promoted to copy chief of the editorial page.

David Hancock, 45, and David K. Ringstrom, 49, were also killed in the automobile accident. Hancock and Snapp were joined in a commitment ceremony in Hawaii last year.

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Trevor Nelson

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Categories: Media, Writers/Editors

Trevor Nelson, a producer for the CBS TV news show, “60 Minutes,” died on July 24 of meningitis. He was 34.
Nelson began his journalism career writing articles for The New York Times, The New Republic and The Wall Street Journal. He spent five years at Christian Science Monitor Radio before joining the Washington bureau of CBS News in 1996. He worked as an associate producer for Lesley Stahl, but was later transferred to the New York office to work for Ed Bradley.
During his seven-year tenure at “60 Minutes,” Nelson served as an associate or co-producer on many news reports. In 2000, he was promoted to full-fledged producer, and worked on 20 segments, 15 of which were broadcast. Two received Emmy nominations.
Nelson regularly produced stories with correspondent Steve Kroft, including segments on disgraced journalist Stephen Glass, the New York State attorney general’s efforts to clean up Wall Street and the Sept. 11th terrorist attacks. He and Kroft also produced the feature, “All in the Family,” a story about how Kellogg Brown & Root, a division of the oil services company, Haliburton, scored a Pentagon contract for a major rebuilding job in Iraq. Haliburton is Vice President Dick Cheney’s former firm.

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Elliot Norton

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Categories: Media

William Elliot Norton, the veteran Boston theatre critic, died on July 20. Cause of death was not released. He was 100.
After graduating from Harvard College, Norton spent 48 years reviewing theatre for The Boston Post, The Boston Record American and The Boston Herald American (now The Boston Herald). He published almost 6,000 reviews, earning him the nickname, “The Dean of American Theatre Critics.”
Norton hosted the “Elliot Norton Reviews” talk show for 24 years on the public television station in Boston, and wrote the book, “Broadway Down East,” for the Boston Public Library.
Norton won a special Tony Award for his coverage of theatre and was voted into the Theater Hall of Fame by the American Theater Critics Association. The Elliot Norton Awards were established in 1982 to honor theatre performed in the Boston area.
“Theater was Elliot’s religion, and no production, however awful, could shake his profound faith. He was the exemplary critic, never an adversary, always a friend,” said Robert Brustein, retired artistic director at the American Repertory Theatre.

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Bobby Harper

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Categories: Media

bharper.jpgBobby “Skinny” Harper, the radio personality who inspired the television character, Dr. Johnny Fever on “WKRP in Cincinnati,” died on July 22 of lung cancer. He was 64.
Harper’s first on-air job was doing the news for the public address system at William Jewell College. Since the 1960s, Harper has produced radio shows in Peoria, Ill., Detroit and Atlanta.
His antics — like riding a wild bull and bellyflopping into a giant ice cream sundae — were popular with listeners but occasionally crossed the line with his employers. Known for his left-wing political speeches and racy humor, Harper was fired several times for his on-air comments.
Audio of Skinny Bobby on the Radio

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