Categotry Archives: Military

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William Brown

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Categories: Military

William Brown, Nevada’s oldest veteran, died on Oct. 12 from natural causes. He was 109.
Born in 1894, Brown served in the U.S. Expeditionary Force in France during World War I. Because he was black, Brown was not allowed to fight beside white soldiers. Instead, for more than a year, he acted as cannon fodder, counting shell holes and keeping roads clear with the artillery division. After his discharge, Brown moved to California and spent two decades working as a short-haul driver for the Pacific Trucking Co.
Hours after his death, Brown’s niece picked up his U.S. Presidential Citation in honor of his longevity and military service. In 2001, he also received a Legion of Honor from the French government.

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Herb Robinson

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Categories: Media, Military, Writers/Editors

Herb Robinson, a well-respected journalist and author, died on Oct. 15 from pancreatic cancer. He was 78.
Robinson was studying journalism at the University of Washington when World War II began. He joined the Army in 1943 and attended officer candidate school before getting shipped off to Burma to serve as a combat platoon leader. When he returned to the states, Robinson completed his degree and entered the media business.
From 1953 to 1965, Robinson worked as a news director, anchor and commentator for KOMO-TV, the ABC affiliate in Seattle. He hosted his own public service show and was honored by the Washington State School Directors Association for his efforts to improve the public’s understanding of local education.
In 1977, Robinson became the editorial page editor of The Seattle Times, a position he held for 12 years. The veteran journalist also wrote fiction; his last novel was the dark comedy, “Kennewick Man.”
To honor him, the Washington News Council has established the Herb Robinson Scholarship. This $2,000 scholarship will be awarded to a student who is planning a career in communications.

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Vince Salerno

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Categories: Military, Musicians

Vincent Frank Salerno, a jazz pianist who continued to perform even as prostate cancer weakened his bones, died on Oct. 10. He was 78.
Salerno started playing the piano when he was seven years old. A decade later, he was able to perform George Gershwin’s “Rhapsody in Blue,” a 52-page piece of music, from memory.
Salerno’s professional music career lasted for six decades. He took one three-year break during World War II to serve with the Army Air Forces. Before he was assigned to the infantry, Salerno played in the Air Force Marching Band and with the USO.
Once he returned to the states, Salerno toured with the Alvino Rey and Ted Fio Rito orchestras. He received a bachelor’s degree in music and a master’s in musical education from San Diego State College. He also spent 22 years with The Variations, the house band at the Hotel del Coronado.

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Hal Clement

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Categories: Education, Military, Scientists, Writers/Editors

Harry Clement Stubbs, an award-winning science fiction author who wrote under the name Hal Clement, died on Oct. 29. Cause of death was not released. He was 81.
Clement earned a degree in astronomy from Harvard in 1943 then served as a lieutenant in the Army Air Corps Reserve during World War II. He flew 35 combat missions either as a copilot or pilot with the 8th Air Force.
Using the G.I. Bill, Clement was able to obtain a master’s degree in education from Boston University and a master’s in chemistry from Simmons College. He taught science for 38 years at the Milton Academy in Milton, Mass., and wrote hard science fiction stories and novels in his spare time.
His first short story, “Proof,” was published in the June 1942 issue of Astounding Science Fiction Magazine. Seven years later, Clement published “Needle,” a novel Astounding also serialized. Numerous short story collections and 14 novels followed, including “Noise,” which was published this year by Tor.
Clement received a Retro-Hugo Award in 1996 for his 1945 story, “Uncommon Sense.” The Science Fiction Writers of America also named him a Grand Master in 1999 for a lifetime of achievement in the field of science fiction writing.
“He was a man of wit and intellect, of warmth and kindness, and he saw wonder in the world long after others grew jaded and cynical,” said science fiction writer Bud Webster. “It’s a hideous understatement to say that he’ll be missed.”

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Pete Howell

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Categories: Military

Horace Pettit “Pete” Howell, an Army pilot and war hero, died on Oct. 5. Cause of death was not released. He was 81.
Howell graduated from the Curtiss-Wright Technical Institute of Aeronautics in California, then joined the Army Air Corps. During World War II, he served as an aviator in England and flew 65 combat missions. For his efforts, Howell was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross and Air Medal.
When he returned to the states, Howell took a job working at Piasecki Helicopter Corp. in Essington, Penn. He remained with the company for 37 years.
In his spare time, Howell volunteered for Red Cross blood drives, recorded publications for the blind and dyslexic and spoke to school children about his wartime experiences. On Memorial Day each year, he read the names of those who died in combat.

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