Categotry Archives: Military

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Bob Hope

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Categories: Actors, Hollywood, Military

bhope.jpgLeslie Townes Hope, the comedic actor who entertained millions of soldiers during wartime, died on July 27 of complications from pneumonia. He was 100.
Born in England, Hope and his family emigrated to America in 1907 to settle in Cleveland, Ohio. As a boy, he changed his name to Bob, and took a series of odd jobs to help make ends meet. It was during this time that Hope first worked as a caddy and developed a passion for golf. In later years, Hope would sponsor the Bob Hope Golf Classic, one of the biggest golf tournaments in the U.S.
When he became a teenager, Hope decided to work in show business. He developed a song and dance act laced with comedic monologues, and in the 1920s, played at The Palace during the height of Vaudeville. Hope later landed parts in several Broadway musicals including “Red, Hot and Blue,” starring Ethel Merman and Jimmy Durante, and “Roberta,” where he met and married nightclub singer Dolores Reade.
He took his schtick to radio, and was signed by Paramount to appear in his first feature film, “The Big Broadcast of 1938,” where he sang, “Thanks for the Memory,” the song that would become his trademark.
Hollywood beckoned and Hope followed. He teamed up with crooner Bing Crosby for seven “Road” pictures, playing best friends who would do anything to win the attention of Dorothy Lamour. Hope eventually appeared in over 60 films, including “The Lemondrop Kid,” “The Paleface,” and “My Favorite Blonde.”
In the 1950s, Bob started working in television, performing in dozens of comedy shows for NBC. Known as the master of the one-liner, he appeared at the Academy Awards more than 20 times as either a presenter or a host. Although he never won the award for his acting abilities, Hope received several special Oscars for his contributions to entertainment and humanitarianism.
During World War II, Hope began a lifelong career of supporting American troops overseas. His Christmas tours boosted the morale of millions of servicemen and women serving in Germany, France, Vietnam and the Persian Gulf. In response, the Navy christened a support ship the “USNS Bob Hope” and the Air Force renamed one of its cargo planes “The Spirit of Bob Hope.”
Hope wrote 10 books, including the 1990 autobiography, “Don’t Shoot, It’s Only Me.” He received 54 honorary degrees and more than 2,000 awards, including the Medal of Freedom from President Lyndon B. Johnson.
In 1998, Queen Elizabeth II of Britain gave him an honorary knighthood and the Library of Congress created the Bob Hope Gallery of American Entertainment. To celebrate his 100th birthday, the famous intersection of Hollywood Blvd. and Vine St. was renamed Bob Hope Square.
Complete Coverage From The New York Times

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Uday Hussein

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Categories: Criminals, Military, Politicians

uday.jpgUday Hussein, Saddam Hussein’s firstborn son, died on July 22 during a firefight with U.S. military forces in Iraq. He was 39.
Uday joined the Ba’ath Party when he was 12. He studied at Al Kharkh Al Namouthajiya School in Baghdad and graduated from the University of Baghdad College of Engineering.
Uday developed a reputation for violence in 1988 when he murdered his father’s personal valet and food taster during a drunken brawl. He was jailed for the crime and sentenced to death, but his father eventually exiled him for a year instead.
After the first Gulf War ended, Uday became the de facto prime minister in Baghdad and head of its paramilitary. He controlled Iraq’s print and broadcast media outlets, ran the country’s sporting events and founded his own paramilitary group, the Saddam Fedayeen. As head of the Iraqi Olympic Committee, Uday imprisoned and tortured three Iraqi soccer stars for losing in the 2000 Asian Cup.
In 1996, unknown gunmen made an attempt on Uday’s life. He was shot eight times, and partially paralyzed from the waist down. In the month after he was discharged from the hospital, Uday killed one of his bodyguards and a woman who spurned his advances.
Although he was elected to the Iraqi Parliament in 2001, Uday lost favor with his father after the assassination attempt. Saddam opted instead to groom Uday’s younger brother, Qusay, to succeed him.

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Qusay Hussein

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Categories: Criminals, Military, Politicians

qusay.jpgQusay Hussein, the heir apparent of Saddam Hussein, died on July 22 during a firefight with U.S. military forces in Iraq. He was 36.
The second son of Saddam, Qusay was largely ignored as a child. He came into political prominence, however, when his older brother Uday offended Saddam with his violent and erratic behavior.
Qusay was educated at the Al Khararkh Al Namouthajiya School in Baghdad and studied law at Baghdad University before he was named commander of Iraq’s intelligence and security services. He lead Iraq’s two elite military groups — the 80,000-member Republican Guard and the praetorian Special Republican Guard, a regiment of 15,000 soldiers charged with protecting the Iraqi president and his family.
After the end of the first Gulf War, Qusay lead the suppression of the Shiite Muslims in southern Iraq. He personally authorized the interrogation, imprisonment and execution of political prisoners and their families, and periodically ordered mass executions. At 25, Saddam ordered Qusay to run the Special Security Organization, the group charged with hiding Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction.
Like his brother, Qusay was the subject of assassination attempts. In 2001, he was wounded in the arm during a drive-by shooting. His security forces then used a rocket-propelled grenade to destroy the assassins’ vehicle.
When American and British forces invaded Iraq in 2003, Saddam chose Qusay to defend Baghdad and Tikrit, the family’s home and power base.

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Jack Davis

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Categories: Military

Jack Davis, Britain’s oldest World War I veteran, died on July 20 of natural causes. He was 108.
Davis joined the army when he was 19. He fought in France and Belgium, and was present at the 1915 battle of Ypres, where German forces used poison gas for the first time.
Just before the Battle of the Somme in 1916, Davis came down with trench fever and was unable to fight. The next day, 19,240 British men were killed. Davis recuperated and returned to the Western Front until the war ended.
“The conditions in which we fought that war were disgusting and distressing and I never thought after that experience that this country would ever go to war again,” Davis once said.

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Joseph Moroz

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Categories: Military

Joseph S. Moroz Jr., an Army photographer known for taking portraits of generals, died on July 7. Cause of death was not released. He was 84.
Moroz enlisted in the Army in 1940. After graduating from its photography school in Denver, Moroz was sent off to war. While stationed in England, he flew on reconnaissance missions to photograph the German sites the allies planed to bomb.
Moroz so loved his job that he kept reenlisting in the Army until he’d served for 22 years. Once retired from active duty, Moroz took a civilian job at Fort Sheridan in Highland Park, Ill., taking pictures of visiting generals and dignitaries. When Queen Elizabeth visited the U.S., the Army flew Moroz to Washington, D.C., to photograph her.

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