Categotry Archives: Misc.

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Wilfred Thesiger

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Categories: Misc.

Sir Wilfred Patrick Thesiger lived an explorer’s life. He traveled to the most distant and desolate parts of the world, and chronicled his adventures in books and on film.
Thesiger was born in the British Legation in Addis Ababa, where his father was British Minister at the court of the Emperor of Abyssinia. He studied at Eton and Oxford in England, then traveled back to Addis Ababa to attend Haile Selassie’s coronation. During World War II, he joined the Sudan Defense Force and helped the now-deposed Emperor Selassie liberate his country from Italian occupation.
After the war, Thesiger explored Iraq, Persia, Kurdistan, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Kenya. He searched for locust breeding grounds in Saudi Arabia, saw the quicksands at Umm as Samim and traveled by camel across the Empty Quarter, the largest sand desert in the world. He described his adventures in the books “Arabian Sands” and “The Marsh Arabs,” and was knighted in 1995.
Thesiger died on Aug. 24. Cause of death was not released. He was 93.

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Cynthia Doyon

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Categories: Misc.

cdoyon.jpgCynthia Ann Doyon, a popular radio host in Seattle, committed suicide on Aug. 5. She was 48.

Every Saturday night for 24 years, Doyon produced and hosted “The Swing Years and Beyond,” on KUOW-FM (94.9). “A quirky mix of swing, R&B, country western, bebop and popular song,” the show featured artists like Nat King Cole, Ella Fitzgerald and Benny Goodman.

Doyon studied history and communications at the University of Washington. Her first job was as the host of a rock-n-roll show at the college radio station, KCMU-FM (90.3). She was also KCMU’s first woman program director.

Doyon died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. She was found on the UW campus.

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Michael Griswold

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Categories: Military, Misc.

Most sailors use electronic compasses and global positioning systems to guide a boat in the right direction. Michael Bernard Griswold used the stars.
Griswold’s insatiable wanderlust led him to enlist in the Navy right out of high school. He was stationed in Alaska until 1954, then moved to Southern California to earn a computer science degree from San Diego State College.
Over the next 30 years, he married, raised a family and worked at the Department of Defense as a civil servant. In his spare time, Griswold coached the Ocean Beach Little League and volunteered as a counselor for troubled teens.
In the mid-1980s, Griswold retired and went through a divorce. With extra time on his hands, he renewed his interest in oceanic travel and studied celestial navigation. He bought the Aeolus, a 28-foot ketch named after the Greek god of winds, and sailed to Hawaii, Samoa and around the Sea of Cortez — using only the stars as his guide.
Griswold died at the end of July from emphysema. He was 70.

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Norman Loop

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Categories: Misc.

Norman Earl Loop’s name will remain among the stars for as long as two satellites remain in space.
Loop was a master welder, boilermaker and iron worker who built early exploration satellites. When he welded the two halves of the Pioneer space probe together, his name was engraved on the probe and on another space-bound satellite.
Before Loop became famous on a galactic scale, he enlisted in the Marines and fought in the South Pacific during World War II. When he was honorably discharged in 1945, Loop moved to New York then Colorado, where he became a member of The American Legion. He also served with the All Veteran Honor Guard and participated in more than 500 military honor services at Fort Logan National Cemetery.
In his spare time, Loop volunteered with Meals on Wheels for almost a decade and maintained the flags at the Littleton Community Center and at the WWII Memorial in Littleton, Colo.
Loop died on July 13 of cancer. He was 78.

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Eva Garcia

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Categories: Misc.

Eva Garcia, a circus artist who performed aerial stunts on ropes and silks suspended from the ceiling, died on Aug. 8. She was 38.
Garcia was performing her acrobatic routine at the Hippodrome Circus in Great Yarmouth, England, when she lost her grip on the safety wire and plunged more than 20 feet to her death. Eight hundred people witnessed the accident.
“There was no safety net because this particular act can’t be done with one,” said circus owner Peter Jay.
Garcia began her circus career when she was seven years old. Her family has been in the business for more than 100 years.

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