Categotry Archives: Politicians

by

Ivan Allen Jr.

No comments yet

Categories: Politicians

Ivan Allen Jr., the former Atlanta mayor who was credited with keeping the peace during the turbulent civil rights movement of the 1960s, died July 2. Cause of death was not released. He was 92.
Allen’s two terms as mayor were busy ones. A Democrat, Allen welcomed integration when other southern leaders decried it, earning Atlanta the nickname, “the city too busy to hate.” In 1963, at the request of President Kennedy, Allen testified before Congress in support of the Civil Rights Act. He was the only elected Southern official to do so.
Allen helped bring professional sports to Atlanta by leading the efforts to build Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium. He presided over the creation of MARTA, the city’s transit system. And when a plane crashed in 1962, killing more than 100 Atlanta leaders, Allen founded the Memorial Arts Center in their memory.

by

Floyd Fithian

9 comments

Categories: Politicians

Floyd Fithian, a former congressman from Indiana, died on June 27 of Parkinson’s disease. He was 74.
Fithian, a Democrat, served in the House of Representatives from 1975 to 1983, and on the Small Business, Government Operations, Foreign Affairs and Agriculture committees.
After his final term in office, Fithian spent two years as the finance director of the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee, and 11 years as the chief of staff for Sen. Paul Simon, D-Ill.
In 2003, Fithian was one of 72 former Congressmen to sign a petition that urged the U.S. and British governments to seek peaceful solutions, rather than war, in Iraq.

by

John Adams

No comments yet

Categories: Politicians, Writers/Editors

The clear-eyed vision of John G. Adams helped end Sen. Joseph McCarthy’s anti-Communism campaign.
While working as the chief legal adviser to Army Secretary Robert T. Stevens in 1953, Adams wrote a 40-page memo detailing his belief that McCarthy’s investigation of the Army for communist sympathizers was a personal vendetta. That memo led to weeks of televised hearings.
Although he called Adams a liar, the American public lost faith in McCarthy’s zealous campaign, and the Senate censured him.
Adams later worked for criminal defense attorneys in Washington, and wrote his memoirs, “Without Precedent: The Story of the Death of McCarthyism,” in 1983.
Adams died Thursday of lung cancer. He was 91.

by

Denis Thatcher

No comments yet

Categories: Misc., Politicians

Sir Denis Thatcher, a retired oil executive and the Iron Lady’s consort, died of cancer. He was 88.
Thatcher, a millionaire with a penchant for gin and golf, was best known as the husband of the formidable, former British prime minister, Margaret Thatcher. His wife was by his side when he died.
Thatcher’s baronetcy will now pass to his son who will become Sir Mark Thatcher, Bt.

by

Strom Thurmond

No comments yet

Categories: Politicians

sthurmond.jpgJames Strom Thurmond, a former segregationist and South Carolina senator, died Thursday. Cause of death was not released. He was 100.
Thurmond’s political career was extensive. He served as a county school superintendent, a state senator and a circuit judge until he enlisted in the Army to fight in World War II. When he came home a war hero, Thurmond returned to politics and became the governor of South Carolina in 1946.
He lost reelection, and ran for president but came a distant third to President Harry S. Truman. Thurmond practiced law until a slot opened up in the U.S. Senate. Then he ran as a write-in candidate and won, becoming the only person in history to capture a seat in Congress by write-in vote.
He was the originator of the 1956 Southern Manifesto, which denounced the Supreme Court’s desegregation ruling. Although he grew up as a Democrat, Thurmond switched to the GOP in 1964. He served as a Republican leader until Jan. 2002.
Thurmond holds two other political records. He performed the longest solo Senate filibuster when he spoke against the 1957 civil rights bill for 24 hours and 18 minutes. He was also the longest-serving senator in history, representing South Carolina for more than 48 years.

1 2 14 15 16 17 18 19