Categotry Archives: Writers/Editors

by

John Eisenberg

1 comment

Categories: Education, Scientists, Writers/Editors

Dr. John F. Eisenberg, a world-renowned expert of animal behavior and evolution, died on July 6 of renal cancer. He was 68.
Eisenberg started learning about mammals in childhood. As a boy living in Washington state, Eisenberg trapped and studied the rodents that lived in the area. After graduating from Washington State University and the University of California, Berkeley, Eisenberg spent many years studying mammals at the National Zoo.
Eisenberg also taught at the University of Maryland and the University of Florida, wrote over 150 articles on ecology and animal biology and published several books on mammals including the influential text, “The Mammalian Radiations: An Analysis of Trends in Evolution, Adaptation and Behavior.”

by

Carol Shields

1 comment

Categories: Writers/Editors

cshields.jpgCarol Ann Shields, a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, died on July 16 of breast cancer. She was 68.
Shields moved from the U.S. to Canada in 1957 after meeting and marrying her husband, Donald Hugh. Fourteen years later, she became a Canadian citizen and started writing books about the lives of ordinary men and women.
“I don’t very often see decent people in novels. Some people don’t believe in them, but I do … I can hardly think of one novel where you read of a happy marriage. It’s not interesting, I suppose, and in this respect I think literature fails us,” Shields once said.
At the age of 40, Shields published her first novel, “Small Ceremonies.” She followed it up with 12 more books, including several collections of short stories and poetry.
Her novel, “The Stone Diaries,” won a Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1995 and was shortlisted for the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Booker Prize. She also received a Canada Council Major Award, two National Magazine Awards, the Orange Prize and a CBC short story award. In 2001, Shields wrote a biography of Jane Austen that won the Charles Taylor prize for literary nonfiction.

by

Reetika Vazirani

1 comment

Categories: Writers/Editors

rvazirani.jpgReetika Vazirani, a prize-winning poet, died on Wednesday in an apparent murder-suicide. She was 40.
Vazirani and her 15-month-old son, Jehan, were found dead with their wrists slashed in the Maryland home of novelist Howard Norman. A note and two large kitchen knives were allegedly obtained by police at the scene. Vazirani also left a message on a friend’s voice mail that said, “I think I’m going to hurt myself.”
Born in India, Vazirani immigrated to the United States in 1968. She graduated from Wellesley College and received a Thomas J. Watson Fellowship to study in India, Thailand, Japan and China.
After earning a master’s degree from the University of Virginia, Vazirani worked hard to establish herself in the most prestigious literary circles. Her poetry appeared in The Best American Poetry 2000, The Kenyon Review, The Nation and the Paris Review. Her first book, “White Elephants,” earned her a Barnard New Women Poet Prize in 1996. “World Hotel,” Vazirani’s second book, won the 2003 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award. Vazirani also received the Pushcart Prize for her poem, “Daughter-Mother-Maya-Seeta.”
Vazirani, who previously taught in the creative writing programs at the University of Virginia and the University of Oregon, was scheduled to begin teaching at Emory University in the fall.
Listen to Vazirani Read Her Poetry

by

Alexander Walker

No comments yet

Categories: Hollywood, Media, Writers/Editors

Alexander Walker, who spent more than four decades working as a film critic for the London Evening Standard, died on July 15. Cause of death was not released. He was 73.
Walker started reviewing films in the early 1950s. He joined the Standard seven years later after being recommended for the job by actor Kenneth More. For the next 43 years, Walker covering everything from major movie releases to film festivals for the newspaper.
“One of his most obvious characteristics was that you never knew which way he would go. Surprise was often a key element in his reviews. He resolutely refused to sit on the fence and staleness, caused by watching stream upon stream of bad movies as well as good ones, never set in. His prose was as polished and as fresh at 73 as when he started,” Derek Malcolm wrote in The Guardian.
Walker served as a governor of the British Film Institute from 1988-94, won the Critic of the Year prize from the British Press Awards three times and received the chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres from France in 1981.
Outside of his film critiques, Walker wrote 20 books, including biographies of Audrey Hepburn, Stanley Kubrick, Elizabeth Taylor, Peter Sellers and Vivien Leigh. At the time of his death, he also planned to write a history of the British film industry.

by

Eliot Wald

No comments yet

Categories: Hollywood, Writers/Editors

Eliot Wald, a comedic writer who was best known for creating the movie critic team of Siskel & Ebert, died on July 12 of liver cancer. He was 57.
Wald began his writing career at The Seed, an underground newspaper in Chicago. He moved on to freelance as a radio/television critic and rock music writer for local newspapers.
In 1975, Wald took a job as a producer for WTTW Channel 11, where he developed the program, “Coming Soon to a Theater Near You.” With a meager $500 budget, Wald paired Tribune film critic Gene Siskel with Roger Ebert of the Sun-Times in a tiny studio where they could face off on the latest Hollywood releases. The show became such a hit that it was eventually syndicated and retitled “Siskel & Ebert.”
Wald moved to New York in the 1980s to write for “Saturday Night Live.” He also funneled his love of comedy into movies, co-writing the screenplays for “See No Evil, Hear No Evil,” starring Gene Wilder and Richard Pryor, and “Camp Nowhere,” starring Christopher Lloyd.
In a 1994 interview with the Chicago Tribune, Wald said he had the perfect job. “I sit on a couch and make jokes,” he said.

1 2 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67