Categotry Archives: Writers/Editors

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Kathleen Raine

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Categories: Writers/Editors

kraine.jpgAlthough she was not well known in the U.S., Kathleen Jessie Raine was considered a grande dame of European letters.
Since 1943, Raine has published more than a dozen books of poetry and nonfiction, including a three-volume autobiography.
Britain’s Royal Society of Literature named Raine one of the 10 greatest living writers in 1991. The following year, she received the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry. She became a commander of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres and won the Edna St. Vincent Millay Prize from the American Poetry Society.
Raine founded Temenos, a school that studied how philosophy and the arts combined with religion, and published the Temenos Academy Review. She was also a leading authority on W.B. Yeats and William Blake.
Raine died on July 7. Cause of death was not released. She was 95.

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Josephine Jacobsen

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Categories: Writers/Editors

jjacobsen.jpgJosephine Jacobsen, an award-winning poet, died Wednesday of kidney failure. She was 94.
Jacobsen was 10 years old when she published her first poem in St. Nicholas Magazine. But it wasn’t until her later years that her work appeared regularly in The New Yorker. She published numerous poetry collections, including “In the Crevice of Time,” which received a nomination for a National Book Award.
In 1971, Jacobsen became a Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, a position now called U.S. poet laureate. She also won three awards from the Poetry Society of America: the Shelley Award, the William Carlos Williams Award and the Robert Frost Medal for distinguished lifetime service to American poetry. She was inducted into The American Academy of Arts and Letters in 1994.
“Poetry is like walking along a little, tiny, narrow ridge up on a precipice. You never know the next step, whether there’s going to be a plunge. I think poetry is dangerous. There’s nothing mild and predictable about poetry,” Jacobsen once said.

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Carolyn Patterson

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Categories: Writers/Editors

Carolyn Patterson, the “Grande Dame of the Geographic,” died on July 7 of cirrhosis of the liver. She was 82.
Patterson started her writing career as a police reporter for the New Orleans States newspaper. In 1949, she moved to Washington and applied for a job as a file clerk at National Geographic. Instead, the magazine hired her as a research assistant.
Patterson was given the opportunity to write the captions (“legends”) for the magazine’s world-famous photographs. Ten years later, she became the legends editor. Patterson was the first woman to become a senior editor at National Geographic, and the first woman to have her name published in its masthead.
An adventurous sort, Patterson also wrote articles for the magazine. She covered Winston Churchill’s funeral in London and built a hut in Haiti. She dodged the poison arrows of hostile tribesmen in Brazil and went white-water rafting off the coast of Australia.
Patterson served as a past president of the Society of American Travel Writers, and published her memoirs, “Of Lands, Legends and Laughter: The Search for Adventure with National Geographic” in 1998.

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Winston Graham

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Categories: Writers/Editors

wgraham.jpgBritish novelist Winston Graham, who wrote the popular “Poldark” series, died. Cause of death was not released. He was 93.
Graham wrote 40 books, but he was best known for Poldark, a series of historical novels about a Tory who returns to 18th century Cornwall after the American Revolution. The Poldark story was later turned into a British Broadcasting Corp. television miniseries, starring Robin Ellis and Angharad Rees.
Graham was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and was made an officer of the Order of British Empire in 1983.

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Gertrude Samuels

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Categories: Writers/Editors

Gertrude Samuels, who died Wednesday at the age of 93, left a 50-year legacy of pictures and words.
Her career began in 1937 when she dropped out of college to join the staff of The New York Post. She covered national and foreign affairs for The Post and then published stories in Newsweek and Time magazine.
During World War II, Samuels worked as an editor, writer and photographer for The New York Times, where she wrote summaries for the Week in Review and then covered news events for the magazine.
In 1955, Samuels won a George Polk award for excellence in education reporting. However, she was best known for her coverage of the Middle East, particularly during the Six Day War.
Her pictorials were popular; they appeared in National Geographic, Redbook and The Saturday Evening Post. In the 1960s, Samuels collected her photographs and writings into the books: “B-G: Fighter of Goliaths; The Story of David Ben-Gurion” and “The Secret of Gonen: Portrait of a Kibbutz on the Border in a Time of War.”
Samuels began freelancing full-time in the ’70s, which gave her a chance to write stage plays and books for young adults. Until a few years ago, she worked as a United Nations correspondent for The New Leader magazine.

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